Elizabeth Warren’s Inconsistent Life Ethic & Pro Choice Politics

Last week, Elizabeth Warren took to Twitter to call attention to the story of a mother whose son was born prematurely and required costly medical care for which Medicaid helped to pay. The Massachusetts senator blatantly adopted pro-life language in her recounting of the family’s story, urging fellow legislators to “step up and fight for the millions of babies like Peter who can’t speak for themselves.”

The irony is comical, but also galling. This rhetoric is coming from the same senator who, in 2015, voted against the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, a bill that would have prohibited most abortions after 22 weeks of pregnancy. That same year, Warren voted against tabling an amendment that would have permitted up to $1 billion in additional funds for Planned Parenthood. Time and again, Senator Warren has failed to stand up for those who can’t speak for themselves.

Not that this is surprising. Warren is, after all, quite cozy with Planned Parenthood and was endorsed by EMILY’s List in her 2012 campaign against former Massachusetts senator Scott Brown. For her purposes, it’s more politically expedient to serve the will of the pro-choice movement than to stand up for a consistently pro-life ethic.

It’s much easier to neglect the unborn millions who can’t speak for themselves.

Despite Warren’s failure to advocate for the unborn, her tweet at least nominally acknowledges the importance of honoring life. In recent years, the pro-choice movement has trended toward a much more brazen form of shamelessness. Miles Smith, an assistant professor at Regent University, has noted that pro-choice activists’ increasingly positive rhetoric concerning abortion mirrors that of Southern slavery advocates before the Civil War. He wrote the following after the Democratic National Convention last summer:


Calhoun’s radical embrace of slavery added to the dehumanization of African-Americans and departed from…

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