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Visual Development with XOD | Hackaday

Early programmers had to represent code using binary, octal, or hex numbers. This gave way quickly to representing programs as text to be assembled, compiled, or interpreted by the computer. Even today, this remains the most common way to program, but there have been attempts to develop more visual ways to create programs graphically. If you program microcontrollers like the Arduino, you should check out XOD and see how you like visually creating software. The software is open source and currently, can target the Arduino or Raspberry Pi.

You can launch the IDE in a web browser or download a local copy. You transfer nodes from a palette into a grid-like workspace. These nodes might be inputs, outputs, processing blocks, or represent real-world I/O devices. Nodes have inputs and outputs of specific types and you connect them together, connecting like types only, although there are blocks that can convert.

For example, to the right is a simple set of nodes that forms the prototypical flashing LED program. A clock node creates a pulse that toggles a memory element and a digital output accepts both the signal and a constant value indicating which port it represents.

This is a simple example, but it does show the intuitive flow of joining nodes. There is a reasonable array of node types and sufficient documentation.

There are out-of-the-box nodes for ultrasonic sensors, temperature sensors, servos, LCDs, buttons, and H-bridges. You can create your own super-nodes (patches) and you also can make multiple disjointed flows to execute more than one task at a time.

When you generate the code you get a lot of boilerplate that sets up the run time system and the nodes you use. Your main code appears to be in an evaluate function. For example, here’s a snippet of the code that corresponds to the simple graphical blink program:


void evaluate(Context ctx) {
State* state = getState(ctx);
TimeMs tNow = transactionTime();
TimeMs dt = getValue<input_IVAL>(ctx) *...

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